Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Bush Approval Sinks to New Low

George W. Bush was never the smartest or most talented politician. But even by the low expectations of the last eight years, the most recent polling data is bad. Very bad.

Here's a headline we saw today, a fitting summary for the many mistakes of the Bush Administration:
Historic Disapproval: Bush Hits All-Time Low Amid Economic Meltdown

5 comments:

Savage Baptist said...

I swear, sometimes I think you gents read only half the news. To listen to you, you'd think that every conservative in the universe has rejected Sarah Palin, and, while I would agree that there are better candidates out there, it is fairly obvious from even a cursory reading of conservative blogging that Governor Palin has quite a lot of support.

When it comes to polls, yes, it is clear that nobody likes George Bush at this point. But again, it's like you read only half the news. The situation still hasn't changed a lick: Bush's ratings are in the toilet, but your Democratically-controlled Congress's ratings are below even that.

Put another way, you seem convinced that the lower George Bush's poll numbers go, the more it indicates that people support leftist policies, whereas it seems to me that the polling indicates widespread dissatisfaction with darn near everyone on the political landscape, regardless of ideological persuasion.

Tulsan said...

Dan, if you are correct, then the GOP has little to worry about come Election Day. Republicans should sit back, relax, and pop a cold one during Palin's debate on Thursday. That's what I'll be doing.

Of course, the top GOP strategists are a bit pessimistic. Maybe they have been watching too much "Saturday Night Live."

Tulsan said...

Speaking of SNL, Tina Fey's impersonation is uncanny. But I don't find it uproarious, because there is no way to top the original. The real Palin is so far over the top, there's no room left for satire.

Savage Baptist said...

Tulsan, I'm not at all sure I follow your reasoning. Why, if I'm correct that

...the polling indicates widespread dissatisfaction with darn near everyone on the political landscape, regardless of ideological persuasion.

would it follow that Republicans should feel confident?

Tulsan said...

You're right, it doesn't logically follow. The GOP shouldn't be confident at all.

Just saying a little too hyperbolically that it's more congenial to nervous Republicans to think voters are generally dissatisfied with Congress, rather than specifically with the GOP.

The article I cited in the entry just below this one shows how Republicans in Congress have deliberately and cynically obstructed popular and decent bills in order to try to stick Democrats with a "do nothing" tag.